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The Recipe For Making A Great Interview

The Recipe For ...

You’ve found the job. I’m talking about the job and you so badly want to make it. Mom’s basement is just not going to cut it any longer. But how best to make the team without getting roasted in the process, and get your just desserts i.e a brand new job? We’ll put the food metaphors on the backburner for now, because here’s our recipe for success.

Ingredients

Follow-up questions // ❓
Thank you cards // πŸ’
A suit, or at least a shirt with a collar // πŸ‘”
Laptop or tablet // πŸ“²
Positive attitude // πŸ‘
A fresh cut  // πŸ’‡
Resume // πŸ“„
Portfolio // πŸ“˜
Research // πŸ”Ž
Relevant experience // 😎
Bright ideas // πŸ’‘

Not always necessary, but could be useful

 A car/bus pass // πŸš™
Time for coffee i.e. πŸ•— πŸƒπŸ’¨ β˜•οΈ
Jokes // πŸ˜‚

 Your application is in and now the gatekeepers to your dream job want to meet you in person. Sweet! Time to suit up. Or dress up—no pun intended. Anyway, here’s what you do:

  1. Come prepared. In the tech industry, though every company is different and the nomenclature for internal positions varies, there are overarching roles.
    1. If you are applying for a Coding/Designing role: Bring your portfolio or a tablet to display past projects or campaigns.
    2. If you are applying for a Managerial/Sales/Account role: Bring a current resume that is clearly delineated and succinctly conveys your skills, expertise and work history.
    3. If you are applying for a Creative role: Bring clips—a website or blog with your collected bylines.
  1. Know not only the role you’re applying for but the company at large.
    1. No, this doesn't mean you should memorize every employee's name or stalk them all on Facebook, but rather, present yourself as knowledgeable, enthusiastic and show you care about where you work.
    2. Offer more than canned answers to your interlocutors. They’ll want to see that you come with bright ideas, fresh perspectives. In short, show them your potential.
    3. Can you do all this while demonstrating that you can vibe with the company culture? If so, proceed to step 3.
  1. This is when the Interview happens. Your “Friday Night Lights” moment. If all goes well, and you’re asked to come back for a follow-up meeting, repeat steps 1 and 2 as necessary and go crush it. After which, continue on to step 4.
  1. Typically, to round-out an interview, your prospective employer will ask you if you have any questions. You bet you do. For instance:
    1. What skills and experiences would make an ideal candidate?
    2. Can you tell me about the team I’ll be working with?
    3. What have you enjoyed most since working here?
    4. What is the top priority for the person in this role over the next three months?
    5. What are some of the challenges the person in this position will face?
    6. Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?
    7. What constitutes success at this position and company?
    8. Do you offer any opportunities for professional training or continuing education?
  1. Interview over, you run the play-by-play in your head and you’re feeling confident. Cool. Reply to your main contact at the company with some follow-up questions so you stay at the top of their mind and inbox. These queries should project professionalism, smarts and appreciation for the role and the interviewers who gave you time from their busy schedules. These questions work well and feel free to ask them as they apply:
    1. Can you tell me about your plans for growth?
    2. What have past employees done to succeed in this position?
    3. What are the next steps in this process?
  1. As a final gesture of your good faith, send the person/people you met with a thank you card—a bit of formality that goes a long way.

All said and done, your interview(s) should have been a success, so, go and keep on crushing it.

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